Overview

A route of administration is the path by which a drug, fluid, or other substance is taken into the body. Routes of administration are generally classified by the location at which the substance is applied. While there are many used medically, the most common forms of ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection. are oral, inhalation, injections, and, controversially, rectally. The choice of route is usually selected on a variety of factors, including:

  • BioavailabilityThe fraction of an administered dose that is absorbed into a living system.
  • The form of the drug (liquid, powder, crystal, etc)
  • Rate of absorption
  • Desired effects (i.e. Certain drugs produce different results based on ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection.)
  • Convenience

Oral

Oral is generally seen as the most convenient and safest ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection.. The limitation is in the fact that the liquids, capsules, tablets, or chewable tablets have to move through the digestive tract. When a drug is taken orallyRoute of administration in which the subject swallows a substance., food and other drugs in the digestive tract may affect how much of and how fast the drug is absorbed. Besides swallowing the dose may be administered through:

  • Buccal (dissolving against the cheek membrane)
  • Sublingual (dissolving under the tongue)
  • Sublabial (dissolved under the lip)

Inhalation

Inhalation is known to be one of the faster and widely used ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection.'s. These typically involve the:

  • Nasal passageways (insufflation) - The drug gets absorbed by the nasal membranes for rapidly doses to the brain. Repeated use can cause long term damage such as a deviated septum.
  • Lungs- This is done through the form of vapor or smoke. This ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection. is a bit hard to dose. Long term use can cause damage to the respiratory system.

Injections

This ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection. is the most rapid, effective, and dangerous. The most popular injection routes are:

  • Intravenious (injection into the vein) - Drugs used this way have a 100% bioavailabilityThe fraction of an administered dose that is absorbed into a living system. and are felt within 10-30 seconds. This is a very easy way to overdose. Long term use can lead to absesscess, vein damage, and tissue/muscle damage.
  • Intramuscular (injection into the muscles) - Most drugs cannot be safely done this way. This allows for slower absorption and is often very painful.
  • Intradermal (Also known as subcutaneous or skin-popping) - This method is for slow, steady absorption. This is often not a recommended ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection. for most drugs.

Rectal

While largely stigmatized, A drug that is administered rectally will in general (depending on the drug) have a faster onset, higher bioavailabilityThe fraction of an administered dose that is absorbed into a living system., shorter peak, and shorter duration than the oral route. Another advantage of administering a drug rectally, is that it tends to produce less nausea compared to the oral route and prevents any amount of the drug from being lost due to vomiting. In addition, the drug will reach the circulatory system with significantly less alteration and in greater concentrations. The bioavailabilityThe fraction of an administered dose that is absorbed into a living system. is usually second only to the IV ROACommon abbreviation for Route Of Administration, used to describe the various different methods of ingesting drugs, including oral, insufflation, sublingual/buccal, rectal, vaginal, intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) injection..


References and More Information

https://wiki.tripsit.me/wiki/Quick_Guide_to_Plugging

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh?term=Drug+Administration+Routes

https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/drugs/administration-and-kinetics-of-drugs/drug-administration

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