The genus Quararibea consists of some twentynine

species (Schultes 1957, 249). In Mexico, the

aromatic leaves ("cacao flowers") of the small tree

Quararibea funebris (La Llave) Vischer [syn. Lexarza

funebris La LIave, Myrodia funebris Benth.]

are used as a spice for cacao drinks (see Theobroma

cacao) (Rosengarten 1977; Schultes 1957).

They have been described as a possible hallucinogen

and also have been identified as the mysterious Aztec inebriant poyomatli. According to

Jonathan Ott, who has experimented with these

flowers as well as cacao preparations containing

them, Quararibea flowers are not psychoactive

(Ott 1993, 418*). However, several interesting

substances are present ()'-butyrolactones, alkaloids)

that may indeed have psychotropic effects

(Raffauf and Zennie 1983).

The Peruvian inebriant espingo, which has not

been dearly identified, has also been interpreted as

the fruit of a Quararibea species. In Amazonia,

Quararibea species are used as ayahuasca additives'

and they are also added to Peruvian San Pedro

preparations (see Trichocereus pachanoi). The

Kofan Indians use Quararibea putumayensis

Cuatr. in the manufacture of arrow poisons (Ott

1993,418*).
Literature

Raffauf, Robert E, and Thomas M. Zennie. 1983. The

phytochemistry of Quararibea funebris. Botanical

Museum Leaflets 29 (2): 151-58.

Rosengarten, Frederic, Jr. 1977. An unusual spice

from Oaxaca: The flowers of Quararibea funebris.

Botanical Museum Leaflets 25 (7): 183-202.

Schultes, Richard Evans. 1957. The genus Quararibea

in Mexico and the use of its flowers as a spice for

chocolate. Botanical Museum Leaflets 17 (9):

247-64.

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The genus Quararibea consists of some twentynine

species (Schultes 1957, 249). In Mexico, the aromatic leaves ("cacao flowers") of the small tree Quararibea funebris (La Llave) Vischer [syn. Lexarza funebris La LIave, Myrodia funebris Benth.] are used as a spice for cacao drinks (see Theobroma cacao) (Rosengarten 1977; Schultes 1957). They have been described as a possible hallucinogen and also have been identified as the mysterious Aztec inebriant poyomatli. According to Jonathan Ott, who has experimented with these flowers as well as cacao preparations containing them, Quararibea flowers are not psychoactive (Ott 1993, 418*). However, several interesting substances are present ()'-butyrolactones, alkaloids) that may indeed have psychotropic effects (Raffauf and Zennie 1983). The Peruvian inebriant espingo, which has not been dearly identified, has also been interpreted as the fruit of a Quararibea species. In Amazonia, Quararibea species are used as ayahuasca additives' and they are also added to Peruvian San Pedro preparations (see Trichocereus pachanoi). The Kofan Indians use Quararibea putumayensis Cuatr. in the manufacture of arrow poisons (Ott

1993,418*).
Literature

Raffauf, Robert E, and Thomas M. Zennie. 1983. The phytochemistry of Quararibea funebris. Botanical Museum Leaflets 29 (2): 151-58. Rosengarten, Frederic, Jr. 1977. An unusual spice from Oaxaca: The flowers of Quararibea funebris. Botanical Museum Leaflets 25 (7): 183-202. Schultes, Richard Evans. 1957. The genus Quararibea in Mexico and the use of its flowers as a spice for chocolate. Botanical Museum Leaflets 17 (9):

247-64.

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