(Created page with "<div>This euphorbia has a questionable reputation as a</div> <div>hallucinogen (Schultes and Farnsworth 1982, 187*;</div> <div>Schultes and Hofmann 1980,367*). This assumption...")
 
 
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<div>Yaqui Indians use the crushed seeds of the</div>
 
<div>Yaqui Indians use the crushed seeds of the</div>
 
<div>plant as a tonic during strenuous exertion.</div>
 
<div>plant as a tonic during strenuous exertion.</div>
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 +
[[Category:Ethnobotanical]]

Latest revision as of 07:37, 11 March 2015

This euphorbia has a questionable reputation as a
hallucinogen (Schultes and Farnsworth 1982, 187*;
Schultes and Hofmann 1980,367*). This assumption
apparently dates back to a report by Victor A.
Reko in his book Magische Gifte [Magical Poisons]
(1938, 176-81*), which claimed that North American
Yaqui Indians use the crushed seeds of the
plant as a tonic during strenuous exertion.

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